Papercut pattern review: The Sapporo Coat

Hi lovlies! I am beyond excited for this project. I fell in love at first sight with the Sapporo coat by Papercut when I saw it on another sewist’s page on Instagram. I know I always say that -but I really mean it this time.

 

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You know how I know that this was true love at first site? Because I was so methodical about each step. I watched the YouTube video at least twice before actually sewing along with the tutorial. I also chose my fabric wisely and with special care. Then I decided to use my muslin -because let’s face it -this is my first coat. This is my first time using boiled wool. This is my first time lining a garment. This is my first time reading instructions that primarily included centimeters and meters. Sorry, I’m so American sometimes!

I want to also add that you can head to my Instagram highlights to see my progress with this project.

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Here are some Pros/Cons that I found with this pattern.

Pros:

  • The Papercut pattern arrived in a sophisticated cardboard box, versus a pattern envelope.
  • The pattern paper is thick. This was sort of like a PRO/CON. I love that it’s durable and that they’re a sustainable company so I can use the pattern over and over. I don’t love that I can’t see directions on both sides of the pattern paper. Don’t worry, I worked this out in my highlights. This is especially helpful if you have a directional pattern on your fabric.
  • I will say that the printing company did an excellent job. The ink did not run or bleed upon ironing out the pattern pieces. Very impressive.
  • There is a YouTube sew along that is incredibly helpful with this project.
  • This is a very popular coat, so there are tons of reviews and information. I chose to use the video.

Cons:

  • I was disappointed that not all of the interfacing pieces were not represented in the pattern pieces. I was so nervous to improvise on this part -but I managed. Somehow I figured out that I needed 3 pieces of interfacing that were 2 inches wide by 24 inches long. The I needed 2 pieces that were 2 inches wide and 12 inches long.

The pattern box says that you will need approximately 3 yards of outer fabric for this project. As a person that does not like to live on the edge (literally and figuratively), I had to be conservative and strategic with my cutting. I strongly suggest that you get 4 yards of fabric.

Modifications: I didn’t have many with this project since I loved the overall construction.

  • The seam allowance. The pattern calls for a 1 cm seam allowance. Translated to inches thats about .394 of 1 inch. And I couldn’t break that all the way down to an agreeable fraction. Luckily this coat is not tailored so it gives you some creative license with the seam allowance. I used a half inch.
  • Your supposed to hand stitch the sleeve lining to the seam of the outer sleeve. I despise hand stitching and skipped this step. I simply serged my sleeve edges of my lining and left them open. Don’t hate me!

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Overall, this coat is by far the most fun and favorite thing that I’ve sewn to date. Mostly, I’m really proud of myself for facing my challenges head on. If this was a year ago, I would’ve looked at the box in panic, thinking “When can I be this talented?” And each step that could’ve been a huge road block for me in the past ended up being a lesson to pass onto someone else. Now I feel like there isn’t anything that I cannot do!

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8 thoughts on “Papercut pattern review: The Sapporo Coat

  1. Beautiful job! You look pretty cute modeling it too!
    Right now, I just do craft sewing, quilting, and clothes for my grandbaby. I have actually made any clothing for myself in years. You have inspired me to branch out and sew something for myself again!:)

    Like

  2. Speechless!! I can’t even word how incredible this is and being that this is your first coat, it is absolutely gorgeous! Love love your outfit all together. So inspiring. I used to “hate” hand stitching but after doing it several times, I quite enjoy it lol. Great job, Raven! Thanks for the tips!!

    Like

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